Visualization of Human Prostate Cancer Using Infrared Radiation
SIU Academy®. Khuskivadze A. 10/13/14; 59791; UP.442 Topic: Imaging
Dr. Alexandre Khuskivadze
Dr. Alexandre Khuskivadze
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Abstract
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Introduction and Objective. The use of near-infrared radiation (NIR) is a promising approach for biomedical imaging of human prostate cancer. The technique has so far been employed only in animal models. The objective of our experiment was to study the possibility of using infrared radiation for imaging of prostate cancer in humans.
Materials and Methods. For our study, we used gross prostate specimens obtained from radical prostatectomy and transvesical prostatectomy. A total of 30 experiments were performed. The prostate was illuminated with small light emitted diode working in the infrared region (850 nanometers), placed in the prostatic urethra from the apical side. Infrared light passed through the prostate tissue and was captured by infrared CCD camera. The experiment was carried out in a dark environment in order to avoid any artifact. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy was performed to locate prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy. Surgery specimens were then studied with standard histopathological techniques to pinpoint the cancerous lesions of the prostate.
Results. Prostate cancer was positively identified in 17 patients. Prostate carcinoma appeared on infrared images as dark spots against a relatively light background and represents areas with high optical dense. In all 17 cases, the location of infrared-detected lesions fully corresponded to that identified by biopsy and histopathology. Thirteen samples obtained through transvesical prostatectomy were diagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Infrared images of those 13 prostate specimens were evenly illuminated, with no dark spots.
Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of identification and visualization of human prostate cancer using a novel infrared imaging technique. Further research is warranted to improve real-time detection of carcinoma and to move this technology toward its potential clinical application.
Introduction and Objective. The use of near-infrared radiation (NIR) is a promising approach for biomedical imaging of human prostate cancer. The technique has so far been employed only in animal models. The objective of our experiment was to study the possibility of using infrared radiation for imaging of prostate cancer in humans.
Materials and Methods. For our study, we used gross prostate specimens obtained from radical prostatectomy and transvesical prostatectomy. A total of 30 experiments were performed. The prostate was illuminated with small light emitted diode working in the infrared region (850 nanometers), placed in the prostatic urethra from the apical side. Infrared light passed through the prostate tissue and was captured by infrared CCD camera. The experiment was carried out in a dark environment in order to avoid any artifact. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy was performed to locate prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy. Surgery specimens were then studied with standard histopathological techniques to pinpoint the cancerous lesions of the prostate.
Results. Prostate cancer was positively identified in 17 patients. Prostate carcinoma appeared on infrared images as dark spots against a relatively light background and represents areas with high optical dense. In all 17 cases, the location of infrared-detected lesions fully corresponded to that identified by biopsy and histopathology. Thirteen samples obtained through transvesical prostatectomy were diagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Infrared images of those 13 prostate specimens were evenly illuminated, with no dark spots.
Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of identification and visualization of human prostate cancer using a novel infrared imaging technique. Further research is warranted to improve real-time detection of carcinoma and to move this technology toward its potential clinical application.
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